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  1. Why is there so little water left on Mars?

    Publishing date:

    June 24, 2021

    Mars is known for its thin atmosphere, where CO2 dominates and provides most of the atmospheric mass and pressure. In fact, the pressure is similar to that in the Earth’s stratosphere, which is a layer of the atmosphere, at more than 30km above the surface.

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  2. Saturn’s north polar hexagon

    Publishing date:

    September 19, 2018

    Analysis of data from the Cassini probe has revealed that a vortex towering more than 300 kilometres above Saturn’s north pole mirrors the famous hexagon cloud pattern observed lower in the planet’s atmosphere since 1980. Sandrine Guerlet from the LMD dynamic meteorology laboratory in Paris, who has co-authored a paper on this discovery, explains.

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  3. Source of Saturn’s kilometric radiation revealed

    Publishing date:

    November 13, 2018

    Using data from the Cassini mission, scientists are unravelling the mechanisms that drive auroral radio emissions at Saturn’s poles, which are key to understanding certain characteristics of the giant ringed planet. Laurent Lamy, an astrophysicist at the LESIA space and astrophysics instrumentation research laboratory (Paris Observatory) and lead author of an article on the subject in the journal Science, gives us the details.

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  4. Solar storms impact Earth’s neighbourhood

    Publishing date:

    December 16, 2019

    Fifteen years after they were first acquired, data from the Cluster mission continue to reveal new insights into the disturbances generated by solar storms when they hit Earth’s magnetosphere. For the first time, scientists have succeeded in measuring the complexity and amplitude of these magnetic wave disturbances using data from the CIS instrument on the four Cluster satellites.

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  6. What do we know about Mars’ interior?

    Publishing date:

    November 26, 2018

    The first missions to reach the surface of Mars date back 40 years, but many mysteries still lie beneath its top layer of iron oxide. To delve deeper into the red planet, the InSight lander is carrying a system able to drill down to five metres and sound Mars’ surface over a radius of thousands of kilometres. Following its arrival on Mars, we talk about what we already know and what we hope to discover there with CNES’s Francis Rocard, head of Solar System Exploration programmes, and Philippe Laudet, SEIS project leader for InSight and head of the agency’s Astronomy and Astrophysics programme.

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  8. ESA chooses the ARIEL telescope to observe exoplanets

    Publishing date:

    June 27, 2018

    ESA’s next scientific mission will focus on characterising exoplanets

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  9. CNES’s Science Programmes Committee meets- Le Havre to host next Space Science Survey Seminar in October 2019

    Publishing date:

    September 20, 2018

    Thursday 20 September, CNES’s Science Programmes Committee (CPS) met at the agency’s Head Office in Paris. The CPS advises the CNES Board of Directors on matters relating to space science research and helps it to shape the agency’s science priorities. Kicking off the meeting, CNES President Jean-Yves Le Gall reviewed the agency’s activities in the fields of universe sciences and Earth-observation. He also announced that CNES’s next Space Science Survey Seminar would be held in Le Havre in October next year.

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  10. Intense sequence for CNES, DLR and JAXA- Hayabusa2 and MASCOT arrive at asteroid Ryugu

    Publishing date:

    June 27, 2018

    The Japanese Hayabusa2 space probe has reached the end of its 3.2-billion-kilometre journey with its passenger, the French-German MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout) lander. Launched in 2014, Hayabusa2 has completed three orbits of the Sun in four years, after which it began a few weeks ago its very slow approach to its final destination. Since today, Hayabusa2 is now escorting Ryugu at a close distance of some 20 kilometres, collecting images and data from this celestial object that spins on itself in a little more than seven and a half hours. MASCOT is scheduled to land on the asteroid in early October.

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  11. Science and space outreach- CNES and Universcience strengthen partnership ties

    Publishing date:

    June 27, 2018

    Wednesday 27 June in Paris, CNES President Jean-Yves Le Gall and Bruno Maquart, President of Universcience, signed a new partnership agreement to step up cooperation between their two organizations with a view to encouraging science and technology outreach and disseminating knowledge to a wide audience, notably younger generations.

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  12. Triton’s atmosphere in the starlight

    Publishing date:

    March 27, 2018

    A campaign led by astrophysicist Bruno Sicardy used a very rare alignment between the Earth, the largest moon of Neptune and a star to analyse the atmosphere of Triton. It is a big first, the coordinates provided by the GAIA orbital telescope set up the observation points.

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  13. Martian organic molecules pique our Curiosity

    Publishing date:

    July 10, 2018

    On 7 June 2018, Science published two important results. The two articles describe the results obtained by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment, on board the Martian rover.

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  14. Green light for Plato

    Publishing date:

    June 22, 2017

    ESA’s Science Programme Committee (SPC) gave its green light for the Plato mission on 21st June 2017. CNES and its partners (CNRS & CEA) can now start developing the mission

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  15. First Vega C launch contract will carry satellite constellation

    Publishing date:

    June 22, 2017

    On 20th June at the international Paris air show, Airbus Defence & Space and Arianespace announced the signing of a launch contract for next-generation very-high-resolution optical observation satellites.

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  16. Solar fireworks for Calipso

    Publishing date:

    August 21, 2017

    On 14 July, a solar flare threatened the Calipso mini-satellite, placing the CNES operational team on high alert.

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  17. SPOT 5 makes its final curtain call

    Publishing date:

    December 15, 2015

    Friday 11 December 2015 at 19:29, the SPOT 5 satellite sent back its last packet of telemetry.

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  18. Mission

    Publishing date:

    July 11, 2017

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  19. European payload selected for ExoMars 2018 surface platform

    Publishing date:

    December 4, 2015

    Two European instruments and four European contributions on two Russian instruments have been selected for the Russian-led science platform that will land on Mars as part of the ESA–Roscosmos ExoMars 2018 mission.

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